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OCT

Breast Cancer: What the Medical Professionals Don’t Talk About

men-wearing-breast-cancer-ribbonWARNING! This is NOT just “another” story for October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month!

Read on to learn something most people and medical professionals don’t know or talk about…

Let’s face it, if you’re a man you probably tune all the “pink stuff” this month right out!  But what if the pink ribbon had a little BLUE in it? Then would you notice it? Do men even know they have breast tissue? And if so, how many of you really DO anything with this awareness?

Ask yourself these questions and see how educated you really are?

(Questions below should be answered by both men and women);

  • Do you know or talk about a family history of ALL cancers for both genders?
  • Do you know that men can be diagnosed with breast cancer?
  • Do you (men and women) perform a self breast exam once a month?
  • Have you changed or improved your diet or nutritional intake to increase prevention?
  • Do you fit in at least 3-5 hours of exercise a week?
  • How much alcohol is “ok” to consume if you’re concerned about breast cancer?
  • Has anyone in your family (men and women) been tested for the BRCA (breast cancer susceptibility gene) mutation?
  • If you have family members (with or without a gene mutation) with Prostate, Ovarian, Melanoma, Pancreatic and other cancers does this increase your risk of Breast Cancer?
  • Does your family doctor, gynecologist or urologist talk to you about your risks due to a family history of cancer(s)?
  • Does your doctor perform a routine breast exam if you’re a man? If not, who is checking you for this if you do have a family history?
  • Can a man have a mammogram?
  • Do men have breasts?

Most of us know the stats on breast cancer in women (1 in 8 women will be diagnosed) but do you know;

  • This year it is projected that over 2,240 new cases of male breast cancer will be diagnosed and over 400 men will die from the disease.
  • 50% of the worlds BRCA (breast cancer susceptibility gene) carriers are male and there is an increased risk from 1% closer to 6% of a diagnosis as a male if a carrier of the BRCA gene.
  • Percentage fatality rate is often higher for men diagnosed with breast cancer as usually no one is checking, men don’t notice the symptoms, men are not aware they can be diagnosed with breast cancer and are not screened on a regular basis with the current insurance regulations.
  • Male breast cancer treatment consist of mastectomy due to limited amount of tissue and often followed with some or all; radiation therapy, chemo therapy and hormone therapy

This October, we need to stretch the boundaries of breast cancer awareness to include men and really help educate. Let’s add some blue to the pink and help men to learn they too can be affected by this disease. Men need to know they do have breasts and what their risk factors are. Women need to be informed not just for themselves, their sisters or daughters but for their husbands, brothers and sons. Let’s show what awareness is really all about and educate all genders.

For more information on Male Breast Cancer, to purchase awareness products or to donate, visit HIS Breast Cancer Awareness (a fully accredited 501c3 nonprofit organization); http://hisbreastcancer.org/




One Response to “Breast Cancer: What the Medical Professionals Don’t Talk About”

  1. Muriel Maat says:

    I am a Parish Nurse and would like to copy this information for my monthly health news letter. Is that possible? I did not find any indication that “print” was available. Please enloghten me. Thank you.

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