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12
JUN

8 Ways to Detox Your Home

Detoxes aren’t limited to body cleanses…you can (and should!) detox your home of harmful chemicals.

There are synthetic chemicals in everything from cleaning products to personal care items, and those chemicals can affect everything from how well you breathe to the health of your pregnancy to your focus at work.

Common Household Toxins

There is substantial evidence linking toxic environmental chemicals to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder, attention deficits, hyperactivity, intellectual disability and learning disorders, according to the collaborative organization Project TENDR (1). The group identifies these seven pollutants that affect children’s development (2):

  • Organophosphate (OP) pesticides
  • Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants
  • Combustion-related air pollutants, which include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter
  • Lead
  • Mercury
  • Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
  • Phthalates

If you have dust in your home—and if you don’t, seriously, what’s your secret?—chances are you’re being exposed to toxic chemicals. In a 2016 meta-analysis of the composite of dust in U.S. homes, researchers reported that “some phthalates, fragrance, flame retardants and phenols are consistently found in 90 percent or more of dust samples across multiple studies” (3).

As scary as all this sounds, we’ve got you covered!

“It’s pretty normal if this all starts to feel a little daunting when you first begin to look into it,” assures Katie Hussong, a registered nurse and holistic health and culinary nutrition coach in Baltimore. “The best approach, I think, is to focus on one thing at a time, to really take the time to understand it, and then to create a healthy swap. Little by little, these small changes can have a huge impact, and it can be an incredibly empowering and enjoyable process.”

So how can we reduce our exposure to harmful chemicals? Here are some smart, simple ways to eliminate toxins at home.

How to Detox Your Home

Learn what you’re facing. “Most folks simply don’t realize how harmful so many products and practices can be,” Hussong says. “We shouldn’t have to think about the chlorine and fluoride in our water or how the germs on our shoes, the closed windows and excessive time spent indoors, or the harmful endocrine disruptors in our favorite skincare, haircare, deodorant, perfume, cookware, cleaners, candles and furniture are all negatively impacting our health.”

Scan your home and make note of potential toxins. You can check the ingredients in your personal care and cleaning products on websites like the Environmental Working Group (EWG). Figure out the biggest offenders in your home, then make a plan to address them one step at a time.

Tackle your personal products. Sunscreen, toothpaste, face wash, lotion—anything you put on or in your body should be detoxified first since it gets directly absorbed. This can seem like an expensive proposition, but focus on one swap at a time. As you use up one product, replace it with a toxin-free alternative. Try using the Think Dirty app to find cleaner options.

Swap out your cleaning arsenal. “Harmful, hormone-disrupting, toxic, synthetic fragrances and chemicals are everywhere, and most of them come from the personal and cleaning products we bring into our homes with the best of intentions,” Hussong says. Eliminate chemical products as you finish them up. Use the EWG list or make your own non-toxic cleaners. Use wet rags to collect dust instead of spraying an unnecessary, chemical-laden dusting product. Make sure your vacuum has a HEPA filter.

Toss your dryer sheets. “​In the laundry room, get rid of those dryer sheets (one of the most toxic items in our homes) today,” Hussong advises. As an alternative, she suggests purchasing (or making your own) organic wool dryer balls. “It’ll cost you less than $20, and they’ll last you years and years. You can also add essential oils to the balls for your own real fragrance, courtesy of Mother Nature. It’s easy to DIY your own laundry detergent and fabric softener, too, if you’re up for it.” You can also use vinegar for a fraction of the cost.

Eat clean. Choose fresh fruits and veggies that have lower levels of pesticides. EWG has created shopper’s guides to help identify which produce you should buy organic and which are safe to buy conventional.

Furnish wisely. When it’s time for a new sofa, or you’re decorating your child’s bedroom, look for products that don’t have toxic flame retardants (4).

Use essential oils. “Because of their many diverse properties—antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, soothing, uplifting, cleansing, etc.—we can use high-quality, ethically-sourced essential oils to replace so much of the toxic stuff we bring into our homes, slather onto our bodies, ​and put into our air, and it can be easy, fun, and super cost-effective,” says Hussong, who is also a doTERRA Wellness Advocate.

Purify the air. Make sure your HVAC, vacuum, air filter and so on utilize HEPA filters. Open windows on a nice day to let fresh air in—and toxic air out. You can also harness nature’s air purifier—plants!—by scattering them around the home. Or, work in essential oils. “Instead of that plug-in air freshener or candle laden with toxic hormone-disrupting chemicals, imagine being able to put a few drops of your favorite essential oils in the diffuser to shift the aroma, energy and mood of your home after a long day of work,” Hussong says. “As they diffuse, the natural antimicrobial properties of the oils will also work to cleanse the air of germs and odors.”

Creating a Healthy Home

Bottom line…yes, our homes are probably full of toxins. But, just like a detox or cleanse for your body, you can detox your home with these simple swaps. Make them one at a time to avoid burnout. Then, when you find one thing that works, keep it up, then shift your attention to the next offender on the list!

“That’s the beauty of the world of natural health. One door opens another, which opens another, and so on. It’s not about being perfect. It’s about progress and creating safe habits that support lifelong health, happiness and vitality,” Hussong says. “And here’s the thing: Once you know this stuff, you can’t un-know it. But there’s power in that, because as the great Ms. Angelou taught us, we do the best we can until we know better. And then, when we know better, we do better.”




15
MAY

LuckyPlanet Natural Cleaning Products

Filed Under: Green Living,Home,Natural Cleaning Aids at 3:56 pm | By: admin

LuckyPlanet is a line of cleaning products created by the LuckyVitamin team. They are powerful on dirt and grime but safe enough to use around your family and pets. From dish soap to window cleaner, everything in the LuckyPlanet assortment is plant-based, non-toxic and cruelty-free. The whole line is free and clear, which means there are no extra scents or weird smells that you’re going to get from these products. If you want to DIY it, you can add some essential oils from our LuckyAromas brand and maybe make your toilet bowl smell like lavender!

LuckyVitamin created these products with you in mind. They are free of synthetic dyes, colors, fragrances, parabens, phthalates, chlorine, bleach, phosphates and ammonia. So keep your home clean and green with LuckyVitamin!

 

Subscribe to LuckyVitamin’s YouTube Channel!

 




15
MAY

Your Eco-Friendly Guide to Hand-Washing Clothes

Filed Under: Home,Natural Cleaning Aids at 3:20 pm | By: Joe Palinsky

Doing the laundry is one of those frustrating inevitabilities in life. You need your wardrobe to look (and smell) as fresh as possible, so making laundry a weekly priority is important. Of course, very few people look forward to this task. Sure, it doesn’t take a lot of effort, but it can definitely eat away at your day.

On top of all this, there are a handful of frustrating environmental issues that stem from the way we wash our clothes. Using a washing machine too much can waste water and energy (1), while certain cleaning products contain agents that can be hazardous to human, animal and plant life (2). Luckily, you can keep your clothes fresh without destroying the planet by taking a few additional eco-friendly steps when going about your routine.

Hand-Wash Your Clothing

The best way to get started is by limiting how much you use your washing machine. Opting to hand-wash your clothing can be a fantastic way to conserve both energy and water. Now, the difficult part of hand-washing your clothing is you need to make time for the task. You will no longer be able to toss your clothes in the machine and go off to focus on another task. Hand-washing requires your full attention and a bit more room in your day.

That said, making space for the activity in your weekly schedule can make you feel more accomplished. To get started, all you need to do is find a large plastic bucket for washing and wringing out each article of clothing. Next, look at tools like a laundry plunger (3) to make the cleaning task easier and a laundry wringer to aid in the drying process. Hand-washing with a plunger has been noted to be effective and requires only a bit more effort than plunging a toilet. You’ll get a little workout for your arms and have some clean laundry in under 15 minutes.

Try Drying Alternatives

You’re already learning how to wash your clothes by hand, why not take things to the next level? Instead of hand-washing and throwing your clothes right into your dryer, you might find it more beneficial to explore some alternatives. Limiting dryer usage can be helpful when you’re conserving energy, but there are a handful of drawbacks to this. For one, it will take more than a day for damp clothing to dry without machine aid. You can speed this process up a bit on a warm, sunny day by utilizing an outdoor laundry line (4).

As mentioned above, the best way to ensure dry clothing in the fastest manner is by thoroughly wringing out each piece of clothing. Doing this action by hand is incredibly straining to your wrists and it requires much more effort than hand-washing. Use a wringer or similar device and you can limit your energy consumption without developing wrist problems in the process.

Use Better Cleaning Products

To get your clothes truly clean while hand-washing, you have to use the right products. Since a number of detergents and bleaches are terrible for the environment, you want to opt for green alternatives. In recent years, a number of new products have appeared on the market promising to deliver options that are less harmful to the planet. With so many different products out there promising the same thing, you might find yourself wondering if everyone is being honest.

Governmental regulations on what qualifies as a “green” cleaning product do not exactly exist. Still, you can consult helpful resources put out by the EPA to become a more informed shopper and avoid using products that contain hazardous chemicals (5). While most brands that make eco-friendly promises are being on the level, it is best to verify the claims on your own to know you’re making the best choice.

Making these slight adjustments to your routine can provide you with a sense of pride that your effort is helping to keep the world as fresh as your hand-washed clothing.

 

For additional tips, check out 5 Ways to Green Up Your Laundry Routine




20
APR

3 Ways to Use Vinegar for Laundry

Filed Under: Home,Natural Cleaning Aids at 2:37 pm | By: Maggie Marton

If you’re looking to pre-treat stains, soften clothes or banish odors from dirty clothes but want to avoid harsh chemicals, then vinegar may be your new best friend.

Using Vinegar for Laundry

Vinegar serves as an alternative to harsh laundry chemicals like bleach. But why? White vinegar is comprised of about 5 percent acetic acid and 95 percent water. “The acid in vinegar is too mild to harm fabrics, but strong enough to dissolve the alkalis in soaps and detergents,” according to the Vinegar Institute. (Yep, it’s a real nonprofit serving the vinegar industry!)

While you can use other vinegars like apple cider, distilled white vinegar is an inexpensive and effective choice. You can pick up a large jug for around $2 at most grocery stores and use it to brighten, soften and de-stink load after load of laundry.

Vinegar can be used in lieu of bleach, stain treatments and fabric softener; you’ll still want to use laundry soap in your machine. So, let’s look at some specific ways to try vinegar in your laundry room.

Rinse Clothes

You can incorporate white vinegar into your regular laundry routine. “Clothes will rinse better if 1 cup of white distilled vinegar is added to the last rinse water,” the Vinegar Institute recommends.

Another option, if your machine has an automatic dispenser for soap, softener or bleach, is to simply add the vinegar to the dispenser. That way, it will automatically dispense at the right time.

As an added bonus, vinegar is a natural disinfectant that is effective against certain types of bacteria (1). Commercially available white vinegar that contains 5 percent acetic acid kills about 80 percent of germs, studies show (2).

Remove Stains

If you find yourself constantly reaching for the stain remover, consider making your own DIY natural spot treatment. Simply mix equal parts vinegar and water, and add a few drops of an essential oil like lavender if desired. Keep on hand to pre-treat any stains.

For large stains, you may want to soak your clothing in about 2 ounces of white vinegar and enough water to cover the stain (3). Leave overnight. Wash with eco-friendly laundry soap.

For stubborn stains like sweat and coffee, you can add a bit of salt to your vinegar soak. Coarse salt is ideal but table salt works just as well. Gently blot the stain. Allow to dry in the sun, and then wash as usual.

Vinegar can even be used to remove rust stains from delicate fabrics like vintage lace (4). Soak the lace in cold water, rinsing several times. Next, gently hand-wash the lace with a wool detergent. Then, tackle rust spots using a mixture of white vinegar and hot water.

As with any cleansing agent, if you’re unsure about using vinegar on certain fabrics, test a drop on a tiny, inconspicuous spot first.

Clean Your Washing Machine

Front-load washers in particular can develop a musty odor over time. You have two vinegar-fix options here: Add two cups of vinegar and run a full hot-water cycle to de-gunk your washer. Or, simply add ¼ cup distilled white vinegar to every load for gunk prevention–and reap the benefits of softer, brighter laundry at the same time.

Ready to swap harsh chemicals for vinegar? One final word of caution: Be sure to read the user’s manual for your washing machine to make sure you’re following the manufacturer’s instructions for running your loads.




13
APR

6 Surprising Essential Oil Uses at Home

Filed Under: Aromatherapy,Home,Natural Cleaning Aids at 3:12 pm | By: Ysolt Usigan

Simply put, essential oils are extracts from plants. They can come from the plants’ petals, stems, barks, seeds, trunks and roots. They contain specific chemical components that work together to create therapeutic benefits.

You’re probably most familiar with using essential oils for aromatherapy purposes—spa treatments, relaxing massages, helping to clear your congestion when you have a cold—but they have many other uses you probably never even thought of. Not only are essential oils anti-inflammatory and anti-spasmodic, they also have antibacterial, antifungal and sedative properties.

“I know people that now find they don’t mind washing the dishes and doing some household cleaning because the oils they’re using not only smell delicious, but also have mood-boosting properties,” says Jessica Klingbaum, certified aromatherapy specialist.

Here are six surprising essential oil uses at home.

Multipurpose Cleaner

Use essential oils from orange, lemon or grapefruit for cleaning everything from glass to counters in your home. Mix with distilled water and/or vinegar to make an all-purpose cleaning spray.

“I love that it’ll leave the kitchen smelling great and there’s nothing toxic in what I’m using,” says Klingbaum, founder of BeHipandHealthy.com. Essential oils can also fight germs and help keep our immune systems strong.

Deodorizer

You can make your home smell nice with essential oils—that’s a given. But did you know you can use it to specifically deodorize the inside of your stale-smelling refrigerator, your stinky trash bins, the bathroom, and even the inside of your shoes?

“Instead of getting some kind of plug-in air freshener for the bathroom, try putting a drop or two of lemon essential oil on the inside of the cardboard roll of toilet paper,” Klingbaum suggests.

Use essential oils derived from cinnamon, cardamom and clove for the kitchen, and jasmine, sandalwood and rose for bathrooms.

Geranium, basil and lavender oil work best to deodorize smelly shoes and shoe closets.

Carpet Freshener

Over time, your floors can start to smell stale. Freshen up your carpet or rug with essential oils made from mandarin or lemon. You can add two drops onto a cotton ball and put it right into your vacuum cleaner bag or put a couple drops on a small piece of newspaper and vacuum it up. Breathe a sigh of relief as your vacuum releases a fresh scent into the air while you clean.

You can also mix 10 drops of an essential oil into 200 grams of baking soda. Store it in an airtight container for a couple of days. When ready, sprinkle it directly onto your carpet before vacuuming.

Sticker Remover

Essential oils can also be your solution for sticker residue or even stubborn price tags on household items that you want to remove. Just a drop or two of lemon essential oil on the sticky spot you’re cleaning up will do the trick, says Klingbaum.

Insect Repellent

Bugs like mosquitoes, ants and beetles are not fans of peppermint, lavender, citronella, lemongrass and rosemary. Use three to four drops per cotton ball and leave them near or around windows and doors to keep little critters at bay.

You can also create a spray using 10 drops of the same essential oils diluted in 8 ounces of water or rubbing alcohol. Shake and use on your skin or clothes to repel insects.

Dust Mite Remedy

Just add a few drops of eucalyptus oil into the water while washing your bedding to rid sheets and pillowcases of mites. You can also mix the essential oil with water in a spray bottle to use on upholstered furniture for the same purpose.




8
MAR

How to Make Cleaning Products with Plants from the Garden

Filed Under: Natural Cleaning Aids at 6:00 pm | By: Mauricio Matusiak

Cleaning products can be one of the biggest risks to your family’s health. The majority of conventional cleaning products contain harmful ingredients, from dangerous chemicals to additives and much more.

Shopping eco-friendly cleaning products is one of the easiest ways to avoid these potentially dangerous products. Made with sustainable manufacturing practices and only naturally derived, safe, non-toxic and biodegradable ingredients, eco-friendly natural cleaners are safe for you and your family and do not negatively impact the environment.

However, if you really want to “go green” when it comes to cleaning products, you can start making your own, plant-based cleaners using herbs, oils, and other natural ingredients. Easy-to-make and easy-to-use, you can also save money making your own products as most of the ingredients don’t cost too much.

For example, you can make a very efficient and safe all-purpose cleaner made of water and vinegar. Plus, water and vinegar can make great glass cleaner products. You can clean windows using newspaper, which works better than paper towels. So, you recycle newspapers and save money by not buying paper towels.

Another great homemade product can be made if you need a potent surface scrub. Try mixing one cup of baking soda with ¼ cup of liquid castile soap as well as add a little bit of glycerin and about 10 drops of tea tree oil.

Additionally, laundry detergent can be very expensive particularly for families with children and/or babies. You can also make your own products ensuring that no harmful ingredients are used on your little ones’ clothes. A simple recipe includes washing soda, borax (sodium borate), and grated natural soap such as coconut soap. You can find several good recipes online to create safe and natural laundry detergent.




12
JAN

Keep Your Home Clean With These 7 Essential Oils

Filed Under: Aromatherapy,Green Living,Home,Natural Cleaning Aids at 12:01 am | By: Mauricio Matusiak
Essential oils are wonderful. They smell great, offer tons of health benefits and can even help cleaning your home. Loaded with naturally antibacterial properties, essential oils are the ideal ingredient for homemade DIY cleaning products. Add oils to clean up and sanitize your kitchen or bathroom or use to enhance your laundry routine. Let’s look at some of the best oils for cleaning and disinfecting your home.

1. Tea Tree

Tea tree oil fights germs, bacteria and viruses in everything from homemade wipes to hand soap and much more. Plus, tea tree oil can be used against bugs helping to deter lice and other pests.

2. Rosemary

Loaded with natural antibacterial and antiseptic properties, rosemary essential oils can be used in many different ways for home cleaning. From homemade soaps to laundry detergent, air freshener sprays to remove stubborn stains, rosemary can be mixed with washing soda,
baking soda, and vinegar to create a powerful stain remover product.

3. Citrus Seed Extract

A powerful antimicrobial agent, citrus seed extract is often used for dishwashing products. Also labeled as grapefruit seed extract, these essential oils are considered natural degreasers and can be very helpful in your kitchen

4. Lavender

One of the best-smelling naturally antibacterial essential oils, lavender can be mixed with another common natural cleaner: vinegar. Just add 4-5 drops of lavender to your vinegar cleaning mixture for its natural antibacterial properties as well as an enhanced scent.

5. Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus is a natural germicide which can help clean and sanitize your home leaving a “great smell” in the air. A powerful dust mite buster, eucalyptus is great for stinky jobs in the kitchen and bathroom, plus it can help to deter pests.

6. Peppermint

Another essential oil that can leave your house smelling great after cleaning, peppermint contains antibacterial properties that can be used in spray cleaners and natural deodorant spray. Easy-to use, you just need to mix 10-15 drops of peppermint with a cup of water in a spray bottle. Shake well and use the air freshener along cracks and crevices to deter ants and spiders.

7. Pine

A common ingredient in cleaners, pine oil is effective at killing yeast spores, E.coli and other household germs. Pine is a strong and powerful ingredient, perfect for ridding the bathroom of mold and mildew and cleaning hard floors while leaving a natural fresh scent.




11
JUL

What Are Phthalates And Why To Avoid Them

Filed Under: Health Concerns & Ailments,Natural Cleaning Aids,Personal Care at 4:00 pm | By: Mauricio Matusiak
shy young beautiful woman in the wind outdoors

Checking labels for potentially dangerous ingredients has become a must for shoppers. A number of chemicals used in hair care and personal care products have reached a new level as companies work to grow their profits and improve production efficiency. Some of these ingredients required to accomplish that can be harmful to your health, especially phthalates. Let’s have a quick look at this chemical ingredient.

What Are Phthalates?

Phthalates are chemical compounds often used in plastic products to increase flexibility, transparency, durability and longevity. Phthalates are found in many shampoos and hair products, personal care, toys, electronics and a variety of household products including detergents, adhesives, plastic wrap, plastic containers, flooring, furniture, wallpaper, shower curtains and other things made of vinyl or PVC. Additionally, food products contain phthalates because foods such as milk, butter and meats are commonly packaged or stored in plastics containing this toxin.

Why Are Phthalates Dangerous?

Phthalates are known as endocrine disruptors because they mimic the body’s hormones and can interfere with natural hormone activity. This can cause abnormalities in the body and may lead to fertility problems and cancer. Phthalates are colorless and odorless liquids and these toxins can be absorbed into the body not only with food but through the air and skin too. Plus, higher temperatures result in higher concentrations of phthalates in the air.

How to Avoid Phthalates

You can reduce your exposure to this harmful chemical by taking a few simple steps. First, don’t microwave food in plastic containers as heat allows phthalates to leach out of products. Second, use glass and stainless steel for storage and drinking, particularly hot beverages. Lastly, phthalates are used in perfumes, eye shadow, moisturizer, deodorant, nail polish, liquid soap, shampoo, conditioner and hair spray. Shop only natural personal care products and check the labels to ensure they are phthalates-free.




5
JUL

How Toxins in Your Home Are Affecting Your Health

Filed Under: Environment,Health Concerns & Ailments,Home,Natural Cleaning Aids at 5:00 pm | By: Mauricio Matusiak
Excited Children Arriving Home With Parents

Fresh, clean air is essential for a healthy lifestyle but how can you ensure that the air you breathe is actually good? That’s a difficult task but there are many ways you can reduce a number of toxins in your home which may be affecting your health.

Exposures to toxic chemicals in your everyday life can actually increase your chances of becoming sick. A good number of these indoor pollutants are not easily detected but can still affect your overall health.

For example, chemicals released from modern building furnishing materials as well as chemical fumes from paints and solvents may only be noticed in the first couple of days but these potentially dangerous gases may hang around for weeks, sometimes months. Additionally, combustion gases from fireplaces and wood burning stoves, carbon monoxide fumes from attached garage as well as chemicals from cleaning products can stick around inside your home and damage your immune system, leaving you more vulnerable to get sick. Removing these toxins from your home allows your immune system to regenerate naturally, and fight off all infectious diseases.

So, how to avoid these toxins? A few simple steps can significantly improve the quality of your home’s air.

First, increase fresh air supply (in other words, open the windows). Proper ventilation is the key to filter out some of the toxins and maintain healthy air inside your home.

Second, indoor plants can also help to purify air quality as plants can up oxygen levels by absorbing chemicals in your air.

Lastly, keep your home clean by regularly dusting and vacuuming to minimize the number of airborne particles. Choose natural cleaning products to reduce the amount of chemicals inside your home and definitely avoid disinfectants as some of these products contain immune-toxicants such as cresol, phenol, ethanol, and formaldehyde, which reduce the ability of the immune system to fight the germs they are killing.




12
MAY

5 Ways to Green Up Your Laundry Routine

Filed Under: Environment,Natural Cleaning Aids at 12:01 am | By: Mauricio Matusiak
Cloths are hanging on clothesline

Did you know you can save money on your electric bill, extend the life of your clothes and significantly reduce your carbon footprint just by switching up your laundry routine? Saving energy and saving water are two of the best ways to go green—and laundry draws from both of those sources! Below are some simple changes you can make to green up your laundry routine.

1. Hang clothes to air dry
Clothes dryers consume so much energy that they should only be used in extreme cases. Use an outdoor line to hang-dry your clothes if the weather is nice or a clothes’ rack for rainy days or if you prefer to air dry your clothes indoors. This simple and efficient method can significantly help you save energy and minimize carbon emissions. Plus, it saves your clothes from the high heat of dryers, which often reduce the lifespan of clothes.

2. Use cold water cycles
You don’t need to wash your clothes in hot water and you can save a ton of energy simply by washing with cold water. Around 90% of the energy a washing machine uses is spent heating the water, which isn’t necessary for the majority of your laundry. Changing the temperature can save you energy and money and your clothes will still get just as clean!

3. Invest in green washing machines
Energy Star washing machines are the way to go as they use about 40% less energy and 50% less water than non-rated models. If you don’t need to buy a new machine just now, keep this in mind when the time comes and enjoy the long-term savings of an Energy Star model.

4. Switch to eco-friendly laundry detergents
One of the most important aspects of greener laundry is using eco-friendly detergents. Conventional products use harsh chemicals that linger on your clothes and drain into your local watershed. Switch to natural laundry detergent that uses plant-based ingredients. It’s just as efficient and is healthier for your family and the environment!

5. Hand wash whenever possible
Removing stains isn’t easy. Fortunately, a good number of them can be removed by hand washing and using natural soap instead of products containing strong chemicals. This simple change has a significant impact—as most conventional, stain-removing products contain harmful ingredients for the environment.

Incorporating these simple switches will make a HUGE difference for your clothes and your utility bills. Has anyone gone green with their routine already? Let us know your tips in the comments!




29
MAR

Your Complete Spring Cleaning Checklist

Filed Under: General Wellness & Wellbeing,Home,Natural Cleaning Aids at 9:40 am | By: Madeline Reiss
Beautiful young woman makes cleaning the house. Girl rubs dust.

Bright, airy, living spaces aren’t exclusive to Pinterest boards and lifestyle blogs. Like most of you, I found motivation to refresh my space with warmer weather on the radar. Looking around my house at every misplaced item, dusty surface, and dirty article of clothing—I couldn’t help but dread the daunting task at hand.

Deciding this wouldn’t be a successful or enjoyable experience if I attempted to clean my entire house at once, I wrote out every task and created a master checklist for spring cleaning! Print it out and check off each completed task as you go (such a satisfying feeling!). Take on one room per day and you’ll have a clean house in two weekends!

 

Some tips on getting started…

#1 Use natural, household products to get a thorough clean that’s free of dangerous chemicals and better for the environment! You can even make your own! Find out how here.

#2 Tackle the kitchen and bathroom first! They’ll take a lot more energy than other rooms, so check those boxes off early.

#3 When decluttering, take items out of their usual places, put them in a pile, pick up each item one-by-one and ask yourself “Do I need this? Do I use this? Does this make me happy?” I’ve found physically handling each item makes me more selective in what I keep, leading to much less clutter to manage! I learned this tip from the KonMari tidying method. It was an instant life-changer, you can learn more here!

#4 Have fun with it! When your physical space is clean and tidy, your mental space will feel a lot clearer as well! Think of it as active meditating. 🙂

 

The LuckyVitamin Spring Cleaning Checklist

Kitchen

__ Declutter! Go through all products/utensils.
__ Clean stove and surfaces
__ Clean Dishwasher and small appliances (blender, toaster etc.)
__ Wipe out and reorganize pantry
__ Scrub fridge and toss expired food
__ Clean the sink and the area underneath
__ Wipe out and reorganize cabinets
__ Wipe walls, garbage can, and mop floors

Bedroom

__ Tackle your wardrobe: declutter, reorganize, donate or discard!
__ Clean any mirrors, windows, blinds etc.
__ Deep clean mattress, wash pillows and bedding
__ Vacuum/mop floor, get under the furniture!
__ Clean all furniture, dust surfaces, knick-knacks & décor

Bathroom

__ Declutter all hygiene/beauty products!
__ Clean out medicine cabinet and other shelves/storage
__ Clean shower & tub
__ Clean blinds & walls, mop floor
__ Clean toilet, dust mirror & surfaces, empty trash!

Living Room

__ Declutter odds & ends—discard, donate or sell!
__ Wash cushions, blankets & any sofa covers
__ Clean carpets/rugs, wipe surfaces
__ Clean TV and electronics
__ Vacuum, sweep & mop the floor—getting under the furniture!
__ Clean walls, dust décor
__ Clean windows, blinds & curtains

Miscellaneous

__ Clean washing machine & dryer
__ Sweep back deck/patio (time for outdoor furniture?!)
__ Wash car
__ Cleaning day of choice! Do a final sweep & tidy up loose ends
__ Empty vacuum, organize cleaning supplies & do a happy dance because YOU DID IT!

 

Take a deep breath and enjoy your fresh start to spring! How did you do? Share your spring cleaning tips and organization hacks below!




21
MAR

How to Tackle Spring Cleaning

Filed Under: Aromatherapy,Green Living,Home,Natural Cleaning Aids at 9:03 am | By: Jessica Justh
Portrait of a Woman Mopping Floor
It’s the time of year again, and with the Spring Equinox comes a time of renewal. That also means that it’s time to clean house, literally. And we are all about products that are good for the environment while simultaneously standing strong against dirt and grime.

Here’s some multi-purpose green cleaning essentials to help you get started…

Dr. Bronners is not your average soap. How can you be average when, as its iconic label clearly states, it has “18 in one uses” and features plant-based surfactants with natural spruce and fir-needle oils. See? Not your run-of-the mill ingredients. Sal Suds All Purpose Cleaner is equally effective with hard or soft water and is 100% cruelty-free.

Baking soda can be used in a ton of DIY cleaning recipes in virtually every room of the house. It can be used as a vital ingredient in toilet bowl scrub, all-purpose clean, even air freshener. It’s deodorizing properties make it perfect for tackling tough cleaning jobs.

Here’s some other type of products you should use to give your house a green clean from top to bottom. Check out our DIY recipes for making your own, but if that’s not your thing or your don’t have the time, we shared some other options too.

Wood Cleaner

DIY Recipe

¼ cup olive oil

1/3 cup white vinegar

1 tablespoon glycerin

1 teaspoon of lemon juice

10 drops lavender

Combine all the ingredients together in a spray bottle.

Time Saver

This wood cleaner not only cleans wood but its nutty aroma will have you happy to be cleaning (sorta). It’s formulated to clean grease and make your wood surfaces shine. It’s non-toxic biodegradable, never tested on animals.

 

All-purpose Spray

DIY Recipe

2 cups water

½ teaspoon Dr Bronners

1 tablespoon baking soda

2 tablespoons of lemon juice

Combine all the ingredients together in a spray bottle. Do not use on wood.

Time Saver

This is an all-around great cleaner. Seventh Generation is known for creating authentic, safe, and environmentally-responsible products for a healthy home. They select ingredients that have minimal scent and don’t assault your sense of smell like so many conventional, chemical-based products.




20
JAN

The DIY Natural Cleaner You’ll Want To Use Again & Again

Filed Under: Green Living,Natural Cleaning Aids at 12:01 pm | By: Jessica Justh
Cleaning.

Store-bought tile cleaners are loaded with dozens of contaminants, many of which have been linked to cancer as well as fertility issues and hormone disruptors. Research done in 2009 detected formaldehyde, toluene and benzene, compounds usually found in gasoline, also in a popular cleaner (we’re not going to name names). Well, we’ve got the perfect tile cleaner for you! It’s great for kitchen backsplashes, tile floors and bathroom tiles. It’s time to start cleaning greener, and we can help!

INGREDIENTS                                                                                                      
1 cup baking soda

¼ cup Dr Bronners

5 drops of tea tree oil

5 drops of lemon essential oil

DIRECTIONS

In a medium-sized bowl, whisk together baking soda dish soap until a creamy consistency is formed. Add essential oils, scoop onto a sponge and scrub away.




14
AUG

New Brands Showcase: EcoKindness

Filed Under: Natural Cleaning Aids,Personal Care at 5:00 am | By: Mauricio Matusiak
If you are looking for natural powerful cleaners with wonderful scents that are healthy for you and your family, Lucky Vitamin has great news for you. We are happy to introduce EcoKindness, an organic and natural brand of cleaning products.

EcoKindness offers a sophisticated range of eco-products created with the powerful properties of USDA organic, therapeutic grade, essential oils. This top-quality line of products with impressive cleaning, deodorizing and freshening agents is designed to detoxify your home and workplace from harmful petro-chemical, ammonia, and chlorine based cleaners.

Each time you use one of EcoKindness 28 eco-products you will also enjoy the positive, therapeutic health and wellness benefits of natural, aromatherapy throughout your home and workplace. The company ensures all products are environmentally responsible, and safe for your family and pets and, of course, they are never tested on animals.

All EcoKindness products are plant-based and these complex formulations contain zero toxins. No fillers, emulsifiers, color scents, preservatives, synthetic fragrances, and artificial additives are ever used and all products contain only 100% organic, therapeutic grade essential oils and purified water. Some EcoKindness products contain a proprietary blend of organic liquid oil castile soap, including organic olive, jojoba, aloe vera and coconut oils. This highly effective combination delivers a remarkable boost of extra grease-cutting power.

You can save even more when you shop EcoKindness products at LuckyVitamin.com. Just enter promo code AUG16NEW16 at checkout to save an extra 15% on all items of this new brand. Here’s the scoop on a bunch of exciting new items at LuckyVitamin.com.




2
AUG

Pack These Cleaners For College Move-In

Filed Under: Green Living,Home,Natural Cleaning Aids at 8:00 am | By: Jessica Justh
cleaning

 

Aaah, college. Where studying (wink!) all night, early morning classes and microwaved meals become part of the new normal. But one thing that doesn’t have to change is your adherence to your eco conscious lifestyle. While keeping your dorm room spic and span may not rank high on your to-do list you can still use cleaning products that are safe for you and the earth.

Air Fresheners – Don’t get a rep for having a stinky dorm room or apartment! Before you grab that aerosol can, did you know that conventional air fresheners can be endocrine disruptors and cause major health problems? Ditch them for one of our favorites, made with natural essential oils and fragrance to quickly freshen that mile-high pile of dirty laundry. The non-aerosol bottle is earth-friendly and its lavender fragrance will be sure to relax, soothe and relieve fatigue for even the most stressed out scholar.

Multi-Surface –Between studying and classes, who has time to think about cleaning solutions for all of the different surfaces in your room? Keep things simple with an easy spray-and-wipe multi-surface cleaner. This brand eradicates over 99.99% of household germs from hard, nonporous surface, including Influenza A, Salmonella and E. coli. You can use it on everything from bathroom sinks, desks, garbage cans and mini fridges.

Wipes – Don’t fall victim to the classic “we’re in the area so we’re just going to drop in for a few minutes” surprise visit from mom and dad. Use these natural wipes to give your room a polished look in mere minutes. No water, suds or rinsing required! Effortlessly wipe away dirt from your books, desk, floors and window sills with these biodegradable, durable and disposable wipes. And, because they are biodegradable, you can safely toss them without harming the environment.