Recent Posts

Topics

Archives

14
NOV

Uses for Cinnamon Essential Oil

Filed Under: Aromatherapy,Green Living,Health Foods at 9:03 pm | By: Jessica Justh, Senior Editor
cinnamonoil

Most of us know cinnamon best as the star ingredient for so many of our most beloved breakfasts and baked goods. From french toast to coffee cake to snickerdoodles, none of them would be possible without the familiar cinnamon stick.

But what about cinnamon oil? Yes, there is such a thing!

Cinnamon oil has been used around the globe to treat numerous medical issues — everything from diabetes to immune support. Cinnamon has antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral and antiseptic properties and is versatile enough to be ingested (yum!) or applied topically.

Diabetes – If you know someone with high blood sugar levels, then we definitely recommend cinnamon. Researchers at the Department of Agriculture’s Human Nutrition Research Center found that cinnamon has a polyphenol compound called MHCP which synergizes with insulin to help those suffering with type 2 diabetes.

Bad Breath – Instead of masking bad breath with one of the many offshoots of the mint family tree, try using cinnamon. Why? Because cinnamon’s properties don’t just hide olor-causing bacteria lurking in your month, it kills it. Try making your own mouthwash using one cup of water and one teaspoon of cinnamon, baking soda and honey. Add the juice of two lemons and store in a mason jar. Way better than the scary “antiseptic”, mouth-burning blue stuff.

Digestion – Cinnamon can eliminate excess gas from the intestines and creates a more alkaline environment in your digestive organs making it a great natural remedy for an upset stomach or morning sickness.

Room Freshener – The aroma of cinnamon ignites nostalgic thoughts of home-baked goods, fall and warmth. Now is the time to fill your home with these scents. Try a lovely room diffuser or candle.

Mosquito Repellent – We all know bug spray is loaded with toxic chemicals. Deter those skeeters the natural way withcinnamon. According to the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, cinnamon is a great source of cinnamaldehyde, which contains an active compound that kills mosquitos dead.

If you are interested in learning more about aromatherapy try blending several healing oils to create your very own scent and enhance their effectiveness. Some of our favorite blending oils with cinnamon are lavender, lemon, rosemary and geranium. Remember to always use a carrier oil when blending and do a test spot to ensure you do not have an allergic reaction.




Leave a Reply